Don’t try this at home: The eye-popping tales of the mad scientists who nearly died in their quest for knowledge: ELECTRIFIED SHEEP

We have all heard of the men in white coats who come and take us away – but what happens when they themselves, the scientists, seem to be losing the plot?

The book talked about here, is, ELECTRIFIED SHEEP BY ALEX BOESE 

Mad as a hatter: Some scientists went to extraordinary lengths to carry out experiments
Mad as a hatter: Some scientists went to extraordinary lengths to carry out experiments

Take the example of Dr John Paul Stapp, a U.S. Airforce flight surgeon, who volunteered in 1946 to fly at 46,000ft to see if deadly gas bubbles would form in his blood.

He survived that, and then decided to find out how rapidly a human being could decelerate.

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Nicola Tesla’s Wardenclyffe Tower

Originally posted: February 20th, 2009 via Nicola Tesla’s Wardenclyffe Tower | Junk Worth Knowing.


Wardenclyffe Tower in Operation
Wardenclyffe Tower in Operation

In 1901 construction was started on a tower in Long Island like no other. Designed to send transatlantic radio signals and provide power to nearby businesses without the use of copper lines, the 55 foot tower loomed ominously.  The dream of Nicola Tesla to provide free power with no lines by harnessing the ionosphere would be demonstrated with this project and backed by notable investors such as J. P. Morgan himself.

The tower was named for businessman James S. Warden who donated the land to constructed the tower, with the agreement that Telsa would provide the businessman’s nearby real estate development (called “Wardenclyffe-On-Sound”) with power. Wardenclyffe was planned to be the first of a series of towers built around the world. The towers would form the “World System” which would connect the world with power and communication services.

Contrary to other great thinkers of the time, Telsa believed wireless power was the future. Figuring out how to charge and profit from the power was something he could not explain.

Wardenclyffe Tower in Operation

After realizing Telsa had no plans to actually make any money from the project, J. P. Morgan stopped investing and encouraged other investors to shy away. Tesla’s patent on AC motors expired before construction was completed severing halting the royalty cash flow he was using to finance the remainder of the project. Regardless, Tesla pushed forward to complete his radical experimental tower.

Tesla’s theory on how the tower would work was that, “By using two type-one sources positioned at distant points on the Earth’s surface, it is possible to induce a flow of electrical current between them.” The inventor also believed that the earth was a charged source (which we know today to be true). His tower would work by combining these two principals and creating powerful disturbances in Earth’s natural electric charge which could then be harnessed. Users of the power would receive it by burying one end of a wire in the ground, and then putting a large conductive sphere on their roof with another wire. One would serve as a negative power source, and the other positive. Tesla called it the “disturbed charge of ground and air method.”

More at original article:  Nicola Tesla’s Wardenclyffe Tower | Junk Worth Knowing.


Alphas’ Heroes Score With Slightly Above-Average Skills

This is a special posting, due to the New Syfy show Alphas depicts a crime-fighting unit composed of slightly above-average teammates.

 Cast of Syfy's Alphas

 Azita Ghanizada plays Rachel. 
Warren Christie plays Cameron Hicks.
Malik Yoba plays Bill Harken.
David Strathairn plays Dr. Leigh Rosen.
Laura Mennell plays Nina Theroux.
Ryan Cartwright plays Gary Bell.
 

They had me at “basal ganglia.”

Early in Syfy’s new series Alphas, ringleader Lee Rosen (played by David Strathairn) explains that one of his crime-fighters can hypnotize strangers on the spot by altering neural connections in others’ brains. When a sci-fi show’s characters carpet-bomb the dialog with $50 technical terms, it’s a sure sign the showrunners will reference some actual science amid the shoot’em-up plot twists.

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Mysterious light burst in sky? Maybe a missile – Technology & science – Science – LiveScience – msnbc.com

A bubble-like burst of light captured on two Hawaii telescopes last week likely has a terrestrial origin, observers say.

 

Two telescopes in Hawaii caught this mysterious burst in the sky on film. The sight is likely that of a test missile venting fuel in the upper atmosphere.

Two telescopes in Hawaii caught this mysterious burst in the sky on film. The sight is likely that of a test missile venting fuel in the upper atmosphere.

The mysterious phenomenon took place in the wee hours of the morning on June 22. At about 3:37 a.m. local time, a white sphere blossomed in the night sky, expanding like a soap bubble and then disappearing. A webcam on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope on Mauna Kea, the tallest mountain in Hawaii, captured the image, as did a camera on the Subaru telescope, also on Mauna Kea.

A bubble-like burst of light captured on two Hawaii telescopes last week likely has a terrestrial origin, observers say.

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Cirque Brings Flying Spider-Woman to Radio City

June 30 (Bloomberg) — Web-scampering arachnids and a high- flying Spider-Woman are prominent in “Zarkana,” Cirque du Soleil’s faltering attempt to lure New York audiences out of the tent and into a theater.

At Radio City Music Hall, there’s no cirque and no soleil. Nightmarish imagery, lots of screeching music and blinding lights add a grating layer of punkish silliness — Cirque’s stock-in-trade — to some heart-in-mouth acts of athletic derring-do.

At one point during the trapeze act, a vaguely female spider-like creature flew overhead, across the vast expanse of Radio City’s gilded orchestra. It wasn’t exactly Spider-Man versus the Green Goblin, though it lasted several minutes longer than the vaunted battle scene playing a few blocks away

via Cirque Brings Flying Spider-Woman to Radio City: Jeremy Gerard – Businessweek.


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