NASA – NASA’s Kepler Mission Confirms Its First Planet in Habitable Zone of Sun-like Star

NASA’s Kepler mission has confirmed its first planet in the “habitable zone,” the region where liquid water could exist on a planet’s surface. Kepler also has discovered more than 1,000 new planet candidates, nearly doubling its previously known count. Ten of these candidates are near-Earth-size and orbit in the habitable zone of their host star. Candidates require follow-up observations to verify they are actual planets.

Original Article by: Michele Johnson, NASA Ames Research Centre

Closer to Finding an Earth

This artist's conception illustrates Kepler-22b, a planet known to comfortably circle in the habitable zone of a sun-like star. Image credit: NASA/Ames/JPL-Caltech

 

The newly confirmed planet, Kepler-22b, is the smallest yet found to orbit in the middle of the habitable zone of a star similar to our sun. The planet is about 2.4 times the radius of Earth. Scientists don’t yet know if Kepler-22b has a predominantly rocky, gaseous or liquid composition, but its discovery is a step closer to finding Earth-like planets.

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Why Hitler hated being called a Nazi — origins of words / phrases revealed

Nazi – an insult in use long before the rise of Adolf Hitler’s party. It was a derogatory term for a backwards peasant – being a shortened version of Ignatius, a common name in Bavaria, the area from which the Nazis emerged

Why Hitler hated being called a Nazi and what's really in humble pie – origins of words and phrases revealed

Nazi – an insult in use long before the rise of Adolf Hitler’s party. It was a derogatory term for a backwards peasant – being a shortened version of Ignatius, a common name in Bavaria, the area from which the Nazis emerged

Did you ever wonder why we complete the buck, eat humble pie or let the cat out from the bag?

The English language is abundant with idioms and expressions which have evolved in meaning on the centuries, often arising from trades or customs which may have long disappeared.

The origins of hundreds of everyday phrases and words have been set out in the new guide.

Its compiler, Indicate Forsyth, has traced them by means of books and writings, some back in terms of Ancient Greece.

Called The Etymologicon, the particular guide studies the influx regarding words into English, particularly occasionally of social change and discord.

Mr Forsyth, a writer and also etymologist, said: “What I love about etymology just isn’t the grand theories but the particular strange back alleys and amazing and ridiculous journeys that terms take. ”

Much of his research was performed in the British Library, following references by way of a succession of dictionaries back, in terms of possible, to their original options. There are competing theories in regards to the origins of some phrases, but he’s got selected those which are supported from the most evidence.

Sir Winston Churchill emerges being a prolific source of words, paid with inventing, among others, the particular terms out-tray, social security and also seaplane.

The book also describes how “hello” was popularised from the advent of the telephone. Right up until then, it had been a great obscure greeting, with people mostly using good morning, good day and good night time.

Alexander Bell, credited with inventing calling, had favoured the nautical “ahoy” being a short, standard salutation, but it failed to catch on.

The research also demonstrates many words entered the language from India through the days of empire, including wash, bungalow, juggernaut and pundit.

Called The Etymologicon, the guide studies the influx of words into English, particularly at times of social change and conflict.

Mr Forsyth, a writer and etymologist, said: “What I love about etymology is not the grand theories but the strange back alleys and extraordinary and ridiculous journeys that words take.”

Much of his research was carried out in the British Library, following references through a succession of dictionaries back, as far as possible, to their original sources. There are competing theories about the origins of some phrases, but he has selected those which are supported by the most evidence.

Sir Winston Churchill emerges as a prolific source of words, credited with inventing, among others, the terms out-tray, social security and seaplane.

The book also describes how “hello” was popularised by the advent of the telephone. Until then, it had been an obscure greeting, with people mostly using good morning, good day and good night.

Alexander Bell, credited with inventing the telephone, had favoured the nautical “ahoy” as a short, standard salutation, but it did not catch on.

The research also shows that many words entered the language from India during the days of empire, including shampoo, bungalow, juggernaut and pundit.

 

From The Etymologicon:

Cold shoulder – cold shoulder of mutton was the sort of leftovers given to unwelcome house guests

Winging it – actor learning lines in the wings

To heckle – originally the process of removing knots from wool, by combing. In eighteenth century Dundee, workers who carried out the task, hecklers, were political radicals and would interrupt their colleague responsible for reading out the daily news

To hector – from the Trojan warrior who would challenge anyone to a fight

Bite the dust – a direct translation of a quote from The Iliad in which a character talks of the death of Hector

Humble pie – a meal made using the “umbles” – innards – of deer and only eaten by the lowliest servants

Pavilion – from the French for butterfly, papillons, which was the name given to the tents erected at medieval tournaments and jousts, because they resembled the insect’s wings

Film buff – from buffalo, the leather from which was worn by 19th century New York firemen who attracted crowds of fans when putting out fires. These aficionados became known as buffs, and the use spread to other experts

Pidgin English – from the pronunciation of “business” by Chinese traders encountered by British merchants in the 19th century

Rolling stone – a seventeenth century gardening implement – similar to a modern roller – used to flatten lawns. The proverb about it gathering no moss, which inspired Sir Mick Jagger and other musicians who used it in their lyrics, gave the phrase a more dynamic image than its prosaic origin suggests

Nazi – an insult in use long before the rise of Adolf Hitler’s party. It was a derogatory term for a backwards peasant – being a shortened version of Ignatius, a common name in Bavaria, the area from which the Nazis emerged. Opponents seized on this and shortened the party’s title Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei, to the dismissive “Nazi”

Let the cat out of the bag – In medieval markets, piglets were sold in bags – a pig in a poke – but a common con was to switch the valuable animal for a worthless cat or dog: buyers were either sold a pup, or, if they discovered the ruse, let the cat out of the bag

The proof of the pudding – from an older meaning of “proof”, meaning “test”

Champion – from the Latin for field, campus. The best soldiers in the field were called campiones, hence champions

In the doghouse – from Peter Pan. In JM Barrie’s 1911 novel, Mr Darling forces the dog to sleep in the kennel, and as a result the children disappear. As penance, he takes to sleeping there himself.

Through the grapevine – from the “grapevine telegraph”, a phrase which emerged during the US Civil War, for an unofficial, word of mouth network along which news was passed, either because Confederate soldiers passed it on while drinking wine after dinner, or because slaves discussed it while picking grapes from vines.

Hoax – from hocus-pocus, which was used by Protestants to ridicule the rite of consecration carried out in the course of Catholic mass, which includes the phrase “Hoc est corpus meum” (“This is my body”)

Average – from an old French term avarie, meaning “damage done to a ship”. Vessels were often co-owned and when repairs were carried out, owners were expected to pay an equal share – the average.

Castor oil – originally the name of a liquid used as a laxative which was extracted from the glands of a beaver – or Castor, in Latin. It was not until the mid-eighteenth century that it was discovered that the same effect could be got from the oil produced by the seeds of Ricinus communis, which became known as the castor oil plant.

Bizarre – from the Basque word for beard, bizar, because when bearded Spanish soldiers arrived in remote Pyrenean villages, locals thought them odd.

Serendipity – word coined in 1754 by Horace Walpole, son of the first prime minister, after reading a book about the island of Serendip – now known as Sri Lanka

Sardonic – referred to those from Sardinia who, in ancient times, were characterised as unfriendly. The Mediterranean island also gave its name to sardines, which were found in its waters

Dog days – the name for the hottest, sultriest part of the summer which coincides with a period, during July, when Sirius – the dog star – cannot be seen as it rises and sets at the same time as the sun.

Pass the buck – from the horn of a deer (buck), which was commonly used as a knife handle. The phrase emerged in nineteenth century America, from when poker players would signify the dealer for each game by stabbing a knife into the table in front of him

Shell out – from the awkward process of getting a nut out of its shell. Artillery shells are so described because early grenades looked like nuts in their shells.

In a nutshell – Pliny, the Roman writer, claimed there was a copy of The Iliad so small it could fit inside a walnut shell

Grocer – one who buys in gross

Kiosk – Turkish word for palace, which gradually becomes less grand as its use as it moves westward across Europe. In Italy it refers to a pagoda-like garden structure

Bigot – old English for “by god”, to describe someone who asserts their own saintliness, while being a hypocrite

Upshot – the decisive, final shot in an archery contest which decided who had won

Soon – was the Anglo-Saxon word for “now” – far more immediate than its current use

 

Original Source, via Why Hitler hated being called a Nazi and what’s really in humble pie – origins of words and phrases revealed – Telegraph.


Grownups puzzled by Hollister store that keeps shoppers at night

Venturing into a clothes shop beloved by teenagers are frequently like entering a different planet for adults, and the experience is much more bewildering for those dragged directly into Hollister, a US fashion sequence.

 

An interior view of Hollister clothing store in the Bullring shopping centre, Birmingham,

 

The stores are so candlelight that parents have complained regarding tripping over tables, bumping directly into fellow shoppers, and being unable to see some of the clothes.

The brand is expanding through the entire country but one of the newest stores, in Birmingham’s Bullring middle, has attracted a stream regarding unhappy customers, including a mother who lost her daughter as it was so dark.

Hollister, which markets itself towards 14 to 18 year-olds which is an off-shoot of the Abercrombie & Fitch brand name, sets the lighting low to make a “club-like environment” complete with ear-splittingly deafening music.

Linda Watson, 51, any mother from Sutton Coldfield, was struggling to find her teenage daughter. “I went along to look somewhere else and I recently couldn’t find her when My partner and i turned around because it’s thus dark. I had to turn out and phone her, ” the lady said.

Another shopper, Linda Peach, coming from Lichfield, Staffs, complained: “When I will end up in there it feels like We have vertigo. I’ve never seen anywhere with numerous lights be so dark. I thought I was at a nightclub. When we will end up in I cling to my children and say, ‘Don’t lose myself. ’”

Even younger shoppers are usually unconvinced. Mrs Peach’s 19-year-old girl, Charlotte, a student, said: “You can’t start to see the prices and you keep bumping into people or tables. ” Jess Hanna, any 20-year-old from Coventry, added: “It’s dangerous within. People keep bumping into the other person. It makes it so perplexing: we went to buy something and when we got to the till it absolutely was a completely different price from what we thought. ”

Nick Half truths, 30, from Birmingham, summed up his experience of the store: “I can’t start to see the sizes, I can’t see the values, I can’t see the right up until: I can’t see the level. ”

Birmingham shoppers are one of many as Facebook groups have been create with such names as “Hollister, you should turn your lights on” and also “Welcome to Hollister, like any torch? ”.

A spokesman for your company declined to comment yet one worker said: “It creates an atmosphere that lets you come in and hang out there while finding some cool garments. It gives a type regarding casino-feel, where people can get lost in the club-like environment, people relax, and hopefully spend more. ”

Despite the gripes, Hollister can be a retailing success story. It opened its first British store in 2008 now has 22, with more ahead. Attractive young people are approached in the pub to become sales assistants — although they may be described as “models” — and shirtless men are used to welcome customers through the particular doors. Shoppers are made to queue outside so that you can make the brand appear a lot more desirable.

Mary Portas, the store guru, said she was a fan with the brand but cautioned that the stores are not for “anyone who likes to search discreetly or who is fazed simply by dim lighting”.

via Adults puzzled by Hollister store that keeps shoppers in the dark – Telegraph.

The full English

The mother tongue you thought you knew much like the back of your hand turns out to be a horse of a distinct colour.

 

Sir James Murray, first editor of the Oxford English Dictionary, faced a monumental task Photo: PA

 

English is a appropriate old mishmash of languages, a hotchpotch containing absorbed influences piecemeal from the four corners in the earth and across all your seven seas. The upshot is that our lingo, this stuff from which in turn we spin our yarns along with crack our gags, what we use to chew the fat and still have a chinwag, has become a new hotbed of verbal oddities.

These quirky turns of phrase – over you can shake a remain at – are second mother nature to us and we have tried them willy-nilly, at the drop of an hat. But the lion’s share of such common or garden sayings, which we think are plain as being a pikestaff, are actually, if you have your noggin, quite quizzical conundrums, and a lot of them, when they show their genuine colours, appear perfectly potty. Get into the nitty-gritty, and the mother tongue that you just thought you knew like a corner of your hand turns out to be a horse of quite some other colour – more like increase Dutch.

Kudos should go for you to Mark Forsyth, then, author in the Etymologicon, who has tried to look into this linguistic mare’s nest and help us understand the wood for the trees. Clearly men who knows his onions, Mr Forsyth have to have worked 19 to the dozens of, spotting red herrings and unravelling inkhorn terminology, to bestow this boon – a work in the first water, to coin a new phrase.

Original Article via The full English – Telegraph.

Rare Sumatran tiger cub triplets displayed at Sidney Zoo

The particular two-month-old cubs make their initial public appearance at Taronga zoo.

The particular cubs, two male and a single female, have been kept out of public view as yet and will only be put on display for a short while each day as they tire quickly and need a lot of sleep.

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